View full image CCFE's Katie Fraser (right) shows the remote handling control room to EUCYS prizewinner Timm Piper (centre) and work experience student Eleanor Trimby.

CCFE's Katie Fraser (right) shows the remote handling control room to EUCYS prizewinner Timm Piper (centre) and work experience student Eleanor Trimby.

A large, microscopic impact

Last week EFDA was proud to host at JET seventeen year old German student Timm Piper, prizewinner in the EU contest for Young Scientists. Timm’s week at JET was a prize for his project in which he developed novel techniques of microscopy – creating hybrid imaging methods by combining traditional techniques to optimise the resolution, colouring, and contrast of the images – such as in the example.

A diatom seen with three conventional techniques: bright field (a), Interference contrast (b) and phase contrast (c). Figure d shows Timm Piper's variable interference-phase contrast hybrid technique

A diatom imaged with three conventional techniques: bright field (a), Interference contrast (b) and phase contrast (c). Figure (d) shows Timm Piper’s variable interference-phase contrast hybrid technique. More details at www.timm-piper.com.

Timm spent an eye-opening week touring many different areas of the JET experiment. “I have gained a great impression of many facets of that huge project, and I could even see some parts of them live!” he said.

“For me the robotic systems used were very interesting. The way they can be controlled as sensitively as possible was very impressive. I even was able to go into the mock up Torus in which controlling the robot is practised.”

“I was very surprised about the size of the flywheels,” he said. “I was stunned by the control room as well. To my eyes the room looked like the control rooms of NASA that are sometimes shown on the TV!”

EFDA wishes all the best to Timm for a bright future in science!